Ex 20:1                      God Spake All These Words                               12/6/2009      ßà   

  • Much Confusion About the Law (Ex 20:1-26)

 

 

 

 

#1.       The Law of God (Ex 16:28, Matt 5:17, Rom 7:12, 14, 16, 22, and 25)

 

 

 

 

  • Sinners and Saints (Rom 3:19, 2Cor 5:21, Hos 4:8, Rom 14:10, 2Cor 5:10)

 

 

 

 

#2.       The Law of Moses (John 7:2,19, Matt 28:1, Col 2:16-17, Acts 13:39, 15:5, 2Cor 3:13-16)

 

 

 

 

  • The Ten Commandments, the Moral Law (Matt 22:37-40, 1John 5:21)

 

 

 

 

#3.       The Law of Christ (Gal 6:2, 4:4, Rom 8:8, Psalm 40:8, Matt 5:17, Eph 6:6)

 

 

 

 

  • The Law of the Spirit of Life (Rom 8:1-11, Rom 7:4)

 

 

 

Please open your Bibles to the Prophecy of Exodus, Ex 20:1 (2X). We have come to Ex 20 where the voice of God thunders down from the mountain to sound the Ten Commandments in the ears of all the children of Israel. Why is God doing that with much thunderings, and lightnings, and the noise of a mighty trumpet, and the mountain smoking? Why did God call these Ten Commandments His covenant, and what is the role of the Law in God’s covenant that saves? These are some questions we want to address in this sermon. And then we realize that it was God Himself who spoke these words. And He spoke these words not only to the children of Israel, but to all of us. And so, the title of this sermon is, God spake all these Words (2X). This is an important principle which we want to remember as we read and study the Bible. God spoke all these words, not man. Let us begin to read Ex 20:1-26,

  • Much Confusion About the Law (Ex 20:1-26)

Ex 20:1-26  And God spake all these words, saying, I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. Thou shalt have no other gods before me. Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth: Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me; And shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep my commandments. Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain. Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labour, and do all thy work: But the seventh day is the Sabbath of the LORD thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nor thy daughter, thy manservant, nor thy maidservant, nor thy cattle, nor thy stranger that is within thy gates: For in six days the LORD made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that in them is, and rested the seventh day: wherefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day, and hallowed it. Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee. Thou shalt not kill. Thou shalt not commit adultery. Thou shalt not steal. Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbour. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbour’s wife, nor his manservant, nor his maidservant, nor his ox, nor his ass, nor any thing that is thy neighbour’s. And all the people saw the thunderings, and the lightnings, and the noise of the trumpet, and the mountain smoking: and when the people saw it, they removed, and stood afar off. And they said unto Moses, Speak thou with us, and we will hear: but let not God speak with us, lest we die. And Moses said unto the people, Fear not: for God is come to prove you, and that his fear may be before your faces, that ye sin not. And the people stood afar off, and Moses drew near unto the thick darkness where God was. And the LORD said unto Moses, Thus thou shalt say unto the children of Israel, Ye have seen that I have talked with you from heaven. Ye shall not make with me gods of silver, neither shall ye make unto you gods of gold. An altar of earth thou shalt make unto me, and shalt sacrifice thereon thy burnt offerings, and thy peace offerings, thy sheep, and thine oxen: in all places where I record my name I will come unto thee, and I will bless thee. And if thou wilt make me an altar of stone, thou shalt not build it of hewn stone: for if thou lift up thy tool upon it, thou hast polluted it. Neither shalt thou go up by steps unto mine altar, that thy nakedness be not discovered thereon.

Verses 1-17 were spoken by God to all the people. Verses 22-26 were spoken by God to Moses. And keep in mind that the previous chapter belongs to chapter 20, for this is the preparatory stage to the giving of the law of God. What do we mean by the law of God? There is much confusion about the law. First of all there is the law of God, where the Ten Commandments are a part of. Secondly there is the law of Moses, which was also given by God, but it was primarily channeled to the children of Israel through Moses. Thirdly there is the law of Christ, which we find mostly in the NT, but some of it also in the OT. Let us discuss these three concepts in this sequence.

#1.       The Law of God (Ex 16:28, Matt 5:17, Rom 7:12, 14, 16, 22, and 25)

The law of God expresses the mind of the Creator, and is binding upon all human beings. It is God’s unchanging moral standard for the conduct of all men. Sometimes the law of God refers to the entire Bible, but most of the time it refers to the Ten Commandments. This law was impressed upon man’s moral nature from the beginning; and although man is now a fallen creature, he still shows the work of it written on his heart. The law of God has never been revoked. God’s moral law still stands, and the very nature of this law demands that it cannot be revoked. This is why the first complaint of God against Israel after they were delivered out of Egypt was their refusal to abide by His commandment in Ex 16:28, “And the LORD said unto Moses, How long refuse ye to keep my commandments and my laws?” because some of the people went out on the seventh day for to gather manna, and they found none. That is why the first statutes which God gave to Israel after their deliverance from Egypt were the Ten Commandments, the moral law. And that is why in the first discourse of the Lord Jesus Christ as recorded in the NT was His declaration in Matt 5:17, ““Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil.” And then the Lord proceeded to expound and enforce the moral law in Matt 5, 6 and 7. And that is why in the first of the Epistles the Holy Spirit has taught us the relation of the law to sinners and saints, in connection with salvation and our subsequent walk in sanctification. And that is why both sinners and saints shall be judged by this law, the law of God.

Please turn in your Bibles to the Epistle to the Romans, Rom 7:12 (2X). Under the influence of the Holy Spirit the apostle Paul spoke about the law of God in Rom 7, where he states the tug of war between his saved soul and his unsaved body. This is the tug of war that exists within any truly saved saint, and this is what God says about the moral law of God in Rom 7:12, 14, 16, 22, and 25,

Ro 7:12  Wherefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and just, and good.

Ro 7:14  For we know that the law is spiritual: but I am carnal, sold under sin.

Ro 7:16  If then I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good.

Ro 7:22  For I delight in the law of God after the inward man:

Ro 7:25  I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord. So then with the mind I myself serve the law of God; but with the flesh the law of sin.

And herein we can see that this tug of war in within a saint, for only a saint can say, “For I delight in the law of God after the inward man.” Clearly verses 22 and 25 tell us that he was speaking of the moral law, or the law of God. Many churches teach that this moral law will be used again on the last day to judge both sinners and saints. But is this really so?

  • Sinners and Saints (Rom 3:19, 2Cor 5:21, Hos 4:8, Rom 14:10, 2Cor 5:10)

Please turn a few pages back to chapter 3 of this Epistle to the Romans, Rom 3:19 (2X). What did I mean when I said that both sinners and saints shall be judged by this law, the law of God? When God began to explain to us the Gospel in the Epistle to the Romans, He began with the bad news. We see in:

Ro 3:19 ¶  Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law: that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.

And so, the entire human race comes into the world under the law of God, and is guilty of breaking that law. And when I speak of being guilty I do not mean that you have a feeling inside that makes you feel guilty. I am not speaking of a guilty feeling, but of an objective declaration of guilt. A judge declares a defendant innocent or guilty. And if he is guilty, he has to pay the penalty for the crime he is accused of. Rom 3:19 says that the entire human race is declared guilty, and the penalty is an eternity in Hell. Even if someone has only one sin for which he is declared guilty, the penalty is still an eternity in Hell. Please turn in your Bibles to the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, 2Cor 5:21 (2X). Out of the miserable mess of mankind God has elected some to become saved by Christ paying for their sins on the cross. The man Christ Jesus, united with God the Son, was appointed by God to be the judge of all mankind. He, the Judge, pronounced us guilty, and sentenced us to an eternity in Hell. Then He stepped from behind the judge’s bench to the front, and paid the penalty on behalf of us. Let us see this in 2Cor 5:21,

2Co 5:21  For he hath made him (to be) sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.

The Greek text says, “For Him who knew no sin, He hath made sin (or a sin offering) on behalf of us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him.”

The KJV has two times the word “For”, but these are different words in the Greek text. The first “For” means “because”. The second word “for” is the Greek word “huper”, which means “on behalf of”, but it does not have the meaning of “in place of”, like in substitution. But what does it mean when God says, “He has made Him sin, or a sin offering?” It cannot be that He was literally sin. No one can pretend this. The expression must therefore be figurative in some sense. Nor can it mean that He was a sinner, for in the same verse God says that “He knew no sin,” and everywhere else in the Bible God says that Christ was holy, harmless, and undefiled. Nor can it mean that Christ was in any sense “guilty”, for no one is truly guilty who is not personally a transgressor of the law. And if He was in any proper sense guilty, then He deserved to die, and His death could have no more merit than the death of any other guilty being. And if He was properly guilty it would make no difference in this respect whether it was by His own fault or by imputation. But all such views as go to make the holy Redeemer a sinner, or guilty, or deserving to be crucified, border on blasphemy, and are abhorrent to the whole tenor of the Scriptures. It is a cornerstone of our entire system of faith that in all senses Christ was holy, and pure, and the object of divine praise. But if the declaration that He was “made sin” does not mean that He was sin itself, or a sinner, or guilty, then it must mean that He was a sin-offering, a sacrifice for sin, and this is the interpretation which is now generally accepted by most expositors. There are many passages in the OT where the word “sin” is used in the sense of sin-offering, for example in Hos 4:8. In either case it means that Christ made an atonement; that He died for sin, and that His death was not merely that of a martyr, but that it was designed by substituted sufferings to make reconciliation between God and man. And thus, God made Him subject to suffering and death, the punishment and consequence of sin, as if He had been a sinner, though He was guilty of no sin. But when Christ made this payment it had to be such that it satisfied the righteousness of God, the justness of God as a Judge. Therefore the payment Christ did make was a full payment, not a mere token, which means that it must have been equivalent to the payment that we would have made, if we would have to pay the full payment ourselves. And thus Christ must have paid the equivalent of an eternity in Hell, for this is what the righteousness of God requires. And all this He did without making Himself dirty with our sins. Think of the metaphor of the infinitely rich Judge, who pronounced the sentence on the criminal, and then He came from behind the judge’s bench and paid the penalty on behalf of the sinner, because we are too poor to pay such a great price. And then we read in 2Cor 5:21, “That we might be made the righteousness of God.” It means that we are declared righteous in the sight of God: that is, we are accepted as righteous and treated as righteous by God on account of what the Lord Jesus Christ did for us. And when did that come to pass? It came to pass the moment that Christ died, for that was the moment when His payment for our sins was completed. That is why He cried victoriously wit a loud voice, “It Is Finished.” And herein is a beautiful contrast between what is said of Christ and what is said of us: He was made sin, we are made righteousness; that is, He was treated as if He were a sinner, though He was perfectly holy and pure; we are treated as if we were righteous, though we are defiled and depraved. And when God declared us righteous at the cross, do not let bad theology give us the shivers for last day events. There are those who cite two verses to support their ignorance of the righteousness of God. Here they are:

Ro 14:10  But why dost thou judge thy brother? or why dost thou set at nought thy brother? for we shall all stand before the judgment seat of Christ.

2Co 5:10  For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ; that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad.

Many churches have not understood that we have already stood before the judgment seat of Christ, for when He paid for our sins He paid them all, not one excepted. And He did that in AD 33 when all our sins were still future sins. Therefore, Rom 14:10, and 2Cor 5:10 are indeed true, and they indeed apply to all mankind, but not at the same time. The saints have already stood before the judgment seat of Christ in AD 33. The unsaved must still stand for trial on the last day, and everyone of them will be found guilty and be cast into Hell. And so, it is of the uttermost importance that we examine ourselves if we have been saved. But once we have discovered that we have been saved, we have no fear for end of time scenarios, for the only one who we should reverently fear is God.

#2.       The Law of Moses (John 7:2,19, Matt 28:1, Col 2:16-17, Acts 13:39, 15:5, 2Cor 3:13-16)

Please turn in your Bibles to the Gospel According to John, John 7:2 (2X). The law of Moses is the entire system of legislation, including the judicial law, and the ceremonial law, which God gave to Israel during the time when they were in the wilderness. There were more than 500 laws on record, which made it impossible for anyone to keep the whole law. The Lord Jesus made reference to that in John 7.

Joh 7:2  Now the Jews’ feast of tabernacles was at hand.

The Lord Jesus indicated that the Jews did some picking and choosing from the ceremonial law. Please drop down to verse 19, John 7:19, where we read, “Did not Moses give you the law, and yet none of you keepeth the law? Why go ye about to kill me?” The Lord Jesus was referring to the law of Moses, which they deliberately did not keep in its entirety. The feast of tabernacles, also called the feast of booths, is held from the 15th day of the 7th month till the 23rd day of that same month, and thus it lands about in October, about the same time that the Lord Jesus was born. The feast of tabernacles, like all the other feast days, belongs to the ceremonial law. But the ceremonial law was done away when Christ rose from the grave. Please turn back about 120 pages to Matt 28:1. The most important feast day in the ceremonial law was the 7th day Sabbath. We can gauge the abolishment of the ceremonial law by the disappearance of the 7th day Sabbath. Literally the Greek text reads in Matt 28:1,

Matt 28:1, “But after the Sabbaths, at the dawning into the first of the Sabbaths, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre.”

The 7th day Sabbath had just past. It was early Sunday morning, and God called this day “the first of the Sabbaths.” Clearly God called an end to a series of 7th day Sabbaths, the Saturday Sabbaths, and a beginning of a new series of Sabbaths, the Sunday Sabbaths. Unmistakably this was the end of the Saturday Sabbaths. And in Col 2:16-17 we read that the entire ceremonial law was done away. Col 2:16

Col 2:16  Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the Sabbath days: Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ.

The meat, or drink, or respecting special days other than the new series of Sabbaths, are all referring to the OT ceremonial law, which were all signs and pictures of Christ and the NT church. The judicial law was done away when Jerusalem was destroyed, so that only the moral law remained.

The law of Moses is brought up many times in the NT. For example, we read in Acts 13:39, “And by him all that believe are justified from all things, from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses.”

But the law of Moses was fiercely defended by the Judaizers. We read in Acts 15:5,

Ac 15:5  But there rose up certain of the sect of the Pharisees which believed, saying, That it was needful to circumcise them, and to command them to keep the law of Moses.

Please turn to the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, 2Cor 3:13 (2X). And so, among the Christians of Jewish descent there was great uncertainty if they should keep the law of Moses. But then, God destroyed Jerusalem, and the Jews were scattered all over the Roman empire, and the Christians knew that it was the will of God that they no longer honor Christ and Moses at the same time. 2Cor 3:13-16

2Co 3:13-16  And not as Moses, which put a vail over his face, that the children of Israel could not stedfastly look to the end of that which is abolished: But their minds were blinded: for until this day remaineth the same vail untaken away in the reading of the old testament; which vail is done away in Christ. But even unto this day, when Moses is read, the vail is upon their heart. Nevertheless when it shall turn to the Lord, the vail shall be taken away.

God tells us here that the symbolism of Moses putting a vail over his face was a picture that they too would take a vail over their mind and be blinded for the spiritual truths that Moses taught them in the law of Moses. For even unto this day the veil is upon their heart. Nevertheless, when for one of them his heart shall turn to the Lord, the veil shall be taken away, and he will understand the spiritual truths of the law of Moses, just like the Christians of the first century AD relished the reading of the OT.

  • The Ten Commandments, the Moral Law (Matt 22:37-40, 1John 5:21)

The Ten Commandments are a part of the Moral law. They are not part of the law of Moses. God took special pains to show us the clear line of demarcation which He has drawn between the two.

First of all, the Ten Commandments, and they alone of all the laws which God gave in the OT were proclaimed by the voice of God, accompanied by the most solemn manifestations and tokens of the Divine presence. Secondly, the Ten Commandments, and they alone of all the statutes and ordinances of God were written directly with the finger of God, written in tables of stone, and written to indicate their lasting and imperishable nature. Thirdly, the Ten Commandments were distinguished from all the other laws which had merely local applications to Israel, by the fact that they alone were laid up in the Ark of the Covenant. Fourthly, a tabernacle was prepared by special instructions from God, and an Ark was prepared made of the most durable wood, and overlaid with gold, and a mercy seat was placed on top of the Ark made of solid gold, and which became the throne of Jehovah in the midst of His people. It was not until the tabernacle was erected and the Ark was placed in the tabernacle, and the two tables of the Ten Commandments were placed in the Ark, that the Lord took up His abode in the holy of Holies within the tabernacle. By this act the Lord showed to Israel that the basis of all His governmental dealings with Israel was through the Moral law, symbolized by these Ten Commandments. Therefore, it is clear that the Ten Commandments should be sharply distinguished from the law of Moses. The law of God, unlike the Mosaic law, is binding upon all men, and the Ten Commandments are a part of the law of God.

When we read the Ten Commandments from the KJV Bible we are surprised by the lopsidedness of the number of words God devotes to the first four commandments, as opposed to the five last ones. There are 249 words in the first four commandments, and there are only 54 words in the last five commandments. Therefore, which commandments does God favor? We can hear it in the answer that the Lord Jesus gave to the lawyer who asked Him this question. We read in Matt 22:37-40,

Mt 22:37-40  Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.

And so, when we read the law on Sundays, remember where God places His emphasis. When we are not paying attention during the worship service, or when we constantly talk to our children during the worship service, or when we read another book than the Bible during the worship service, remember that God considers this a greater sin than being unkind to our neighbor. And don’t tell me that you have never heard this before, for I have mentioned it several times. The apostle John says in 1John 5:21,

1Jo 5:21  Little children, keep yourselves from idols. Amen.

If during the worship service you are engaging in activities which are other than worshipping the Lord, I will dare to say that you have idols that you are worshipping in place of the Lord. And sadly to say in many cases it is the parents who lead their children astray. In such cases, it is the children’s duty to tell their parents, and to tell it like it is.

#3.       The Law of Christ (Gal 6:2, 4:4, Rom 8:8, Psalm 40:8, Matt 5:17, Eph 6:6)

The law of Christ is God’s moral law in the hands of a Mediator. Often the law of Christ means to be kind to our neighbor. We find the law of Christ in many places i the NT. For example we read in Gal 6:2,

Ga 6:2  Bear ye one another’s burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ.

What is meant here is that we actively engage in the second law that the Lord Jesus gave in Matt 22:39, “Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.” But this activity of loving our neighbor is only fulfilling the law of Christ if we have been saved first. And this is obvious since we know that God says in Rom 8:8, “So then, they that are in the flesh cannot please God.” And so, first we must be born from above, and then can we bear one another’s burden, and so fulfil the law of Christ. But it is also the law that Christ Himself was made under. We read in Gal 4:4, “But when the fulness of the time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law.” The love of Christ for His fellow man made Christ come in the fulness of time, to redeem them that were under the law of sin and death, so that we might receive the adoption of sons of God. And how did He redeem them? by suffering and dying on the cross of Calvary. The law of Christ was in His heart. We read in Psalm 40:8, which is a Messianic Psalm

Ps 40:8  I delight to do thy will, O my God: yea, thy law is within my heart.

The law of Christ is the law that He came to fulfil on our behalf. We read in Matt 5:17, “Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfil.” He came to fulfil the law on our behalf, so that we can be saved, for only when Christ fulfills the law in our place can we be perfect, and perfection is what God requires. The law of God is now termed the law of Christ as it relates to Christians. As creatures we are obligated to serve the law of God, but as redeemed sinners we are bond-slaves of Christ. Therefore it is our obligation to serve the Lord Jesus Christ. Eph 6:6 reads

Eph 6:6  Not with eye service, as men pleasers; but as the servants of Christ, doing the will of God from the heart;

From the heart, means that our soul is no longer our own; Christ purchased it, and His holy Spirit came to dwell within it. And that is really the big question: Do we have the Spirit of God dwelling within? If I am a saved man, then I now belong to Christ, the Mediator, by His work of  redemption. Christ has purchased me on the cross, and therefore am I now under the law of Christ. The law of Christ then is just the moral law of God, now in the hands of a Mediator. And so, do we have the Spirit of God?

  • The Law of the Spirit of Life (Rom 8:1-11, Rom 7:4)

Please turn in your Bibles to the Epistle to the Romans, Rom 8:1 (2X). This chapter follows the chapter where the apostle Paul laments his tendency to fall into sin. This tug of war exists, because the unsaved body is in conflict with a saved soul, which has become the dwelling place of God. But herein lies the secret to having peace with God, for our salvation does not depend on how holy we are, for salvation is not of works. We read in Rom 8:1-11,

Ro 8:1-11 There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death. For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh: That the righteousness of the law might be fulfilled in us, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. For they that are after the flesh do mind the things of the flesh; but they that are after the Spirit the things of the Spirit. For to be carnally minded is death; but to be spiritually minded is life and peace. Because the carnal mind is enmity against God: for it is not subject to the law of God, neither indeed can be. So then they that are in the flesh cannot please God. But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of his. And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin; but the Spirit is life because of righteousness. But if the Spirit of him that raised up Jesus from the dead dwell in you, he that raised up Christ from the dead shall also quicken your mortal bodies by his Spirit that dwelleth in you.

The new law that is brought up in this passage is “the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus.” It is the law of salvation because we are in Christ. We have died to the law of Moses, and we have died to the moral law, the law of God. Rom 7:4 says, “We are become dead to the law by the body of Christ.” It means that there is no more sin found in our soul, for God Himself dwells therein. Back to verse 2. What is the law of sin and death? It is the law of God that becomes the law of sin and death for every unsaved soul, for the wages of sin is death. But the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus hath made me free from the law of sin and death. For what the law of God could not do was to bring change in a man’s heart. No matter how great the penalty was, the law of God could only point out sin and magnifies sin, but the sinner remained a sinner. And then verse 4 says, “In order that the righteous demand of the law might be fulfilled in us, for if God declared us righteous at the cross, then we are righteous in His eyes, and the righteous demand of the law of God has been satisfied. And then we read for the second time, “Who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.” Let us be clear on this: that we are not saved because we walk not after the flesh. Not of works! Not of works! The reason we do not walk after the flesh but after the Spirit is because we are indwelt by God’s Spirit. Remember verse 9, which says, “Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of his.” Therefore verse 10 says, “And if Christ be in you, the body is dead because of sin; but the Spirit is life because of righteousness.” Righteousness is given to us the moment Christ died, for He said, “It Is Finished”.

These are glorious words, which we can hang our hope on, the hope of life eternal with Christ in the NH&NE.

AMEN.                 Let us turn to the Lord in prayer.