Phil 2:7                      The Two Natures of Christ; Kenosis                8/11/2012     

·        Why Am I Addressing This Topic? (Mark 13:32)

 

 

 

 

#1.       Kenosis (Mark 13:32, Phil 2:6-8, John 17:5, Phil 2:11, John 6:38-39)

 

 

 

 

·        Worm Theology (Job 17:14, 24:20, 25:5, Isa 66:24, 40:17)

 

 

 

 

#2.       The Great Step Down (Job 25:6, Heb 2:9)

 

 

 

 

·        The Incarnation (John 1:14, Phil 2:5-11, Luke 1:35, Col 2:9, 1John 4:2-3)

 

 

 

 

·        Asking for More Understanding (John 1:1, Luke 23:34)

 

 

 

 

#3.       He Became One of Us (1Tim 2:5-6, 1Cor 15:21, 1Pet 2:24, Matt 7:13-14)

 

 

·        Why Am I Addressing This Topic? (Mark 13:32)

Please open your Bibles to the Gospel According to Mark, Mark 13:32 (2X). The title of this sermon is, The Two Natures of Christ (2X), which is referring to His Divine nature and His human nature. Why would I want to dig into such a difficult topic? This doctrine has always been a point of serious controversy throughout the centuries, and all sorts of heresies were developed in the course of history. I am not a theologian, and I am not a professor in a seminary, and I am not in a position to uphold the honor of a seminary before God. But as the pastor of this congregation I am obligated to present to you the truth of any doctrine that comes along, no matter how long it takes to study this difficult matter. Moreover, I realize that a correct concept of the Person and the two natures of Christ, of the relation between the Person and the two natures, and of the relation between the two natures mutually are of central significance in the doctrines that we believe. But we must have our concepts of God and Christ correct, or else we would be worshipping an idol who is not Christ.

How did we end up in this hornets’ nest? Perhaps you remember that we read in Mark 13:32,

Mark 13:32, “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.” This reflects an apparent lack of omniscience of the Lord Jesus Christ. He is supposed to know the day and the hour that He will come again, for He must atone for the sins of all His saints all the way until the last day and hour. You remember that the man on the radio broke his teeth on this verse. He went through all kinds of gyrations to justify his own actions of predicting the day of Christ’s return. He even went so far to claim that the term “the Son” does not refer to Christ but to Satan. That is when I stepped into this hornets’ nest to explain the apparent discrepancy by bringing in the human nature and the Divine nature of Christ.

First of all, I want to make an apology about the things I have said, and about the doctrines that I have uttered in the recent past, about the Divine nature of Christ and about His human nature. Scrap all that. I was wrong. I should have been more careful in developing those concepts. There is a simpler explanation. We need to develop this all over from the beginning. And since I have proven that I do not have the brains to do that all by myself, and I do not have the brains to reinvent the wheel, I have learned to lean on the wisdom of past theologians, and most of all on the wisdom of God the Holy Spirit who has guided the church throughout the centuries to develop concepts that are totally harmonious with everything that we find in the Bible. And so, the teachers I have selected to teach me the concepts I was looking for are passages from the Bible, and the summaries of those passages which are called “confessions” that have been adopted by the churches throughout he centuries, and also the works of the late Herman Hoeksema who seemed to have a good grasp of almost everything that most churches keep silent about. Is it OK for pastors and Bible teachers to keep silent about difficult doctrines? No, it is not OK for the Lord Jesus spoke of good shepherds and hirelings. The hireling fleeth when he sees the wolf coming. Now the wolf may not be a person, but a false doctrine, or a false concept of God that threatens to overtake the church. And today there are many who try to sell us a false concept of God, and that is plain idolatry. Those who remain silent are the hirelings. And today most pastors and Bible teachers are hirelings. A good shepherd has the obligation to study every difficult doctrine, or every concept of God, and teach his congregation what the Holy Spirit has revealed through the Word of God. So let us attack this problem now head on.

#1.       Kenosis (Mark 13:32, Phil 2:6-8, John 17:5, Phil 2:11, John 6:38-39)

Mark 13:32, “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.” This reflects an apparent lack of omniscience of the Lord Jesus Christ. What is the simpler explanation that explains how this could have come to pass? The answer comes from the field of “Kenosis.” Please turn in your Bibles to the Epistle to the Philippians, Phil 2:6-8 (2X). What is Kenosis? Kenosis is a Greek word, derived from the word “Kenoo”. The literal meaning of the verb “Kenoo” is “to make empty of content, or to deprive of possession or property. “Kenosis” concerns what Christ did when He became man, meaning that Christ emptied Himself, or Christ divested Himself of His privileges when He came to earth, as we find it in Phil 2:6-8. We read:

Phil 2:6-8, “6  Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: 7  But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: 8  And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.” This is what we need to understand, to understand Kenosis.  

The Bible portrays Christ as existing in the form of God. But Christ did not count the being on an equality with God a prize to be taken advantage of or to be profited by. Rather, He made Himself of no reputation, or He emptied Himself. In what way does Kenosis apply to Christ? In what way did Christ empty Himself? Did He empty Himself of deity that He ceased to be God? Certainly this cannot be the meaning, for that would be self-annihilation. Did Christ retain the Divine attributes of holiness, love and truth, while emptying Himself of omniscience, omnipotence and omnipresence? In other words, since there were times that Christ did not show omniscience, like in Mark 13:32, does this mean that Christ did surrender the independent exercise of these attributes? That also is not precise. Let us look again at the text in question, Phil 2:6-8. The pre-incarnate Christ existed in the form of God. He did not regard His being on an equality with God as a prize to be used to His own advantage Rather, He deprived Himself by taking the form of a servant. The question now is: Of what did He deprive Himself? He deprived Himself of the manner of living which He had with God before He became man. “The form of God” in which the pre-existent Christ was, is nothing different than “the Divine glory”. The words “being in the form of God” corresponds perfectly with John 17:5, where we read that Christ prayed for a restoration to “the glory which I had with thee before the world was.” By His own voluntary decision Christ deprived Himself of His manner of living surrounded by Divine glory. From Mark 13:32 we understand that “this manner of living” included His perfect omniscience. This manner of living He had always enjoyed with His Father. The form of God involved glory. The form of a slave involved humility. Christ did not cease to be God when He deprived Himself of Divine glory and of perfect omniscience. Neither has Christ ceased to be man when He was free from the humiliation of the servant after the cross. In depriving Himself of His pre-incarnate manner of living, involving the radiation of Divine glory from His being, and involving His perfect omniscience, Christ made clear His complete awareness of all that redemption costs. Such a self-deprivation is described in Phil 2:8 as a humbling of Himself, a becoming obedient even to the point of death. This is followed by God’s exaltation of Christ with every being confessing that Jesus Christ is Lord to the glory of God the Father (Phil 2:11). Glory forsaken is forever reclaimed after His ascension into heaven. This explains His apparent lack of omniscience before the cross, even though at the time of the cross He must have been fully aware of all the sins for which He had to atone, for the Lord Jesus said in John 6:38-39, “38  For I came down from heaven, not to do mine own will, but the will of him that sent me. 39  And this is the Father’s will which hath sent me, that of all which he hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the last day.” Kenosis explains the temporary lack of omniscience of the Lord Jesus when He exclaims in Mark 13:32, “But of that day and that hour knoweth no man, no, not the angels which are in heaven, neither the Son, but the Father.” Let us understand Kenosis now from a different perspective. It is from the perspective of “Worm Theology”.

·        Worm Theology (Job 17:14, 24:20, 25:6, Isa 66:24, 40:17, Mark 8:36)

Please turn in your Bibles to the Prophecy of Job, Job 17:14 (2X). In this section of the sermon I want to focus on three words, two Hebrew words and one Greek word. The first is the Hebrew word with Strong’s Concordance number <07415> which has been translated “worm.” We read in Job 17:14,  I have said to corruption, “Thou art my father: to the worm <07415>, Thou art my mother, and my sister.” Even though this passage is poetic in character, it contains a symbolism which has been used by God to convey certain truths concerning the nature of mankind. Through the fall of Adam in the Garden of Eden all his posterity has been cursed with a fallen human nature, which means that we all are born wicked by nature, and we all are by nature the children of wrath; or to say it in another way: children of the wrath of God, all infected by original sin, and on the way to hell. When God looks upon the human race, all He sees are despicable creatures who are as despicable as worms. And what kind of worms does God see? The worm defined by <07415> is a maggot, a flesh eating worm hatched from the egg of a fly. How disgusting! Can we get some confirmation of this? Please turn to Job 24:20 (2X). Job is meditating on the destiny of the wicked and about the wrath of God on the wicked. Then we read in Job 24:20, “The womb shall forget him; the worm <07415> (the maggot) shall feed sweetly on him; he shall be no more remembered and wickedness shall be broken as a tree.” It means that on the last day his mother shall forget him, in hell the maggot <07415> shall have a feast on him, he shall be no more remembered, and wickedness shall cease, for all the wicked shall die. All the wicked shall be infected with the eggs of flies which turn into maggots and the wicked themselves shall become maggots. Then Bildad the Shuhite, the little guy (he is only a shoe-height) from the three friends of Job, reminds Job that Job is by nature only a maggot. We read in Job 25:6, “How much less man, that is a worm <07415> (a maggot)? and the Son of man, which is a worm <08438>? The second worm in Job 25:6 is the Son of man, which is pointing to the Lord Jesus Christ. Here the worm can mean a scarlet caterpillar, or it can also mean a maggot. Now, let us think this out for a moment. When the Lord Jesus Christ came into the world He came in the likeness of sinful flesh. If sinful flesh is pictured by God as a naked maggot, then we must interpret the second worm <08438> also as a maggot, and not as a hairy red caterpillar. Now, this conclusion is confirmed by what we read in Isa 66:24. Please turn to the Prophecy of Isaiah, Isa 66:24 (2X). Isaiah prophesies of the wicked in hell, and how they have to suffer while being eaten by worms.

We read in Isa 66:24, “And they shall go forth, and look upon the carcases of the men that have transgressed against me: for their worm <08438> shall not die, neither shall their fire be quenched; and they shall be an abhorring unto all flesh.” These words were almost literally repeated by the Lord Jesus in Mark 9:44,46,48 where He said three times, “Where their worm <4663> dieth not, and the fire is not quenched.” Here the Greek word <4663> means a “maggot.” Unquestionably, hell is a place where the maggot does not die and the fire is not quenched. There will always be bodies for the maggots to eat, down to eternity, and the fire of their torment will not be quenched forever.

And thus the Hebrew word <08438> in Job 25:6 and in Isa 66:24 also refers to a maggot. It does not mean that in every place where we find the Hebrew word <08438> we should interpret it as “maggot”, but only where ever the context tells us. There are many more Scriptures I can bring up, but these are sufficient to prove the point. What is the point I am making here? What conclusions can we derive from these passages? The first conclusion is that the nature of man in his unregenerate state is as disgusting as that of a maggot. When Satan is cast into hell on the last day he holds in his hands a bag of maggots. That is not a great prize to be proud of, but that is all that he gets. And surely the Bible affirms that Satan’s prize is not very great. We read in Isa 40:17, “All nations before him are as nothing; and they are counted to him less than nothing, and vanity.” But after we have been saved we have become in God’s sight more valuable than anything that God has created. The Lord Jesus said in Mark 8:36-37, “36  For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?  37  Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul?” In other words, the soul of one of Gods elect is worth more than the whole world with all the trinkets in it. There is nothing as valuable as one soul of God’s elect. That is why we are sent into the world to proclaim the Gospel of Christ crucified, for it is through the preaching of the Gospel together with the work of God the Holy Spirit that the souls of the elect are converted. The second conclusion is that the Lord Jesus Christ came in the likeness of sinful flesh. He came in our likeness, except for original sin. Can you see that this was an enormous step down for the Lord Jesus? In order to communicate with mankind, and in order to atone for the sins of mankind, and in order to become our Redeemer, which means our “Brother”, He had to become like one of us. But we were like filthy flesh eating maggots. He had to come to our level, except for sin. And that is truly “Kenosis”. Christ laid down His glory in order to accomplish atonement for the sins of His creatures. Let us try to understand this great step down that He had to make in order to do the work He set out to do. I can present this to you in dry facts which put you to sleep, but let us look at Kenosis in another way, in a metaphor which makes it interesting to see Christ laying down His glory as in a spiritual picture.

#2.       The Great Step Down (Job 25:6, Heb 2:9)

Just imagine that you have a great love for maggots. I know that this is almost impossible, for maggots are such disgusting creatures, but maggots are also very useful creatures. If there were no maggots and if there were no other micro-organisms which devour dead bodies, then do you realize that by now the surface of this earth would be covered with bodies of dead people and of dead animals? That would be a far more disgusting sight than maggots. And so, let us imagine that you have a great love for those naked worms that are called maggots. But since maggots are such stinking disgusting creatures, and since maggots are also violent creatures, for they are flesh eating creatures, God is going to cast all those maggots into hell where they are going to burn forever. Can you imagine how that hurts you in your soul, since you love those maggots? What could be done about that? Someone should warn those maggots that they should not devour the bodies of people, but they should only eat the bodies of animals, for people were made in the image of God; and so people are special; people are holy, which means “set apart”. Someone should instruct the maggots to stay away from people, for if they do violence to the bodies of people it makes God angry. Let other micro-organisms take care of the decomposition of dead people. The maggots do not have to add insult to injury. But you are the only one in the entire universe who would be able to talk to them, and to instruct the maggots. God has given you the special ability to communicate with maggots.

And so, your love for these stupid maggots is so great that you decide to become a maggot. You become like one of them, and you are going to talk to them. God has given you the ability to become like one of them. You know that they are not going to be friendly, for they are violent creatures, and you know that eventually they are going to kill you, because you are interfering with their established routines. They do not like that. But in spite of all that you decide to go ahead and become a maggot. This is truly Kenosis. You have to lay down your power as a human being, and your honor of being made in the image of God, and being able to see the future destiny of millions of maggots because they do not know the wrath of God. You have to lay down everything you have. But once you have become a maggot, can you shed white blood? Yes you can, for you have made that transformation. You have reincarnated yourself into that particular maggot. Your human nature and your maggot nature have become one being. That particular maggot is you. There is no more separate human nature that you can fall back on. Can you realize what a great step down this is? But now, can you realize what a great step down it is for Christ to step down and become a human being? It is a much greater step down than for a human being to become a maggot. First, for Christ to become a human being is an enormous step down. The Bible describes it in Heb 2:9 as Christ being made a little lower than the angels. Secondly, from Job 25:6 we understand that the second step down for Christ is to become as low as a maggot, for this is how low the human race has sunk because of Adam’s sin. Now, the purpose of this sermon is not to talk about maggots, but to talk about the two natures of Christ. The reincarnation of you into a maggot is somewhat of a picture of the incarnation of God the Son into the Son of Mary. Just like your nature and the maggot nature have become one being, so the nature of God the Son and the nature of the Son of Mary have become one, the Lord Jesus Christ. And so, what can we say about the union of God the Son with the Son of Mary? Can we still hold on to a separate human nature and a Divine nature? No!  They are not separate any more, just like your reincarnation into a maggot has done away with your separate human nature and the maggot nature, even so in Christ the human nature and the Divine nature has become one. This touches on the miracle of the incarnation. Let us look at the incarnation more carefully.

·        The Incarnation (John 1:14, Phil 2:5-11, Luke 1:35, Col 2:9, 1John 4:2-3)

Please turn in your Bibles again to the Epistle to the Philippians, Phil 2:5 (2X). While you look this up let me repeat the doctrine of the incarnation as stated explicitly in John 1:14, where God says, John 1:14, “And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.” The Word refers to God the Son. In the New Testament the usage of the word “flesh” means “human nature”, meaning both human body and human soul. The word “incarnation” is from the Latin, and it means “becoming flesh”, that is becoming human. The doctrine of the incarnation teaches that the eternal Son of God, referring to God the Son, became human, and He did so without any manner or degree diminishing His Divine nature. Look again at the detailed statement of the incarnation as given in Phil 2:5-115  Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: 6  Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: 7  But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: 8  And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. 9  Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: 10  That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of things in heaven, and things in earth, and things under the earth; 11  And that every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.”

This passage plainly says that Christ Jesus, remaining in the form of God, in the possession of all the essential attributes of God, took the form of a servant, and died on the cross.

The virgin birth is necessary for our understanding of the incarnation. In the process of ordinary conception and birth a new personality begins. But Jesus Christ did not begin to be when He was born. He is the eternal Son. The virgin birth was a miracle wrought by God the Holy Spirit whereby the eternal Son of God “became flesh”, which means that He took to Himself a genuine human nature in addition to His eternal Divine nature. We read in Luke 1:35, “And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son of God.”

It was the miracle of the virgin birth. God the Holy Spirit has never been thought of as the father of Jesus. The Lord Jesus was not half man and half god, like the Greek mythological heroes. He was fully God, the Second Person of the Trinity. We read in Col 2:9, “For in him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily.” At the same time He became genuinely a man. According to 1John 4:2-3, to deny His genuine humanity is “the spirit of Antichrist.” Many have tried to formulate the doctrine of the incarnation and have failed. It was finally formulated at the council of Chalcedon in AD 451 that the church declared that Christ was “born of the virgin Mary” and is to be acknowledged in two natures, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably, the property of each nature being preserved, and concurring in one Person. This doctrine is stated in the Westminster Shorter Catechism in question number 21 as follows: The only Redeemer of God’s elect is the Lord Jesus Christ, who being the eternal Son of God (God the Son), became man, and so was, and continueth to be God and man, in two distinct natures and one Person forever. The formulation of the council of Chalcedon was the culmination of more than three centuries of discussion in which the church eliminated a variety of false interpretations. This is the danger that those who try to reinvent the wheel run into. What was the variety of false interpretations that were condemned throughout those centuries?

#1, The Gnostics in the first century AD, who were condemned in 1John 4:2-3, denied the genuine humanity of Jesus and taught that He only appeared to suffer. #2, The Ebionites in the second century AD denied His deity. #3, The Arians condemned at Nicea in AD 325, denied that His Divine nature was equal with the Father’s. #4, The Apollinarians condemned at Constantinople in AD 381 denied that He had a complete human nature, body and soul. #5, The Nestorians condemned at Ephesus in AD 431 admitted to the two natures of Christ, but taught that He was two personalities. #6, The Eutychians condemned at Chalcedon in AD 451 taught that the two natures of Christ were so united and so changed that He was neither genuinely Divine nor genuinely human. #7, Only the Biblical doctrine of the incarnation formalized at Chalcedon in AD 451 is the correct Christology of the true historical church. Briefly this is stated in the Westminster Shorter Catechism, Q. 21.

·        Asking for More Understanding (John 1:1, Luke 23:34)

We need an understanding of the words of the doctrine; we do not need just a formula to repeat. We need to worship the Christ of the Scriptures, and we must have a clear concept of whom we worship. First, the emphasis upon the unity of His personality means that He was, in Himself, in His ego, in His non-material self, the same numerical identity, the same Person. The person who was God and who was with God “in the beginning” (John 1:1) before He created the universe, is the same Person who sat wearily at the well of Sychar, and it is the same Person who said, “Father forgive them, for they know not what they do” (Luke 23:34), and we can explain His apparent weakness by the process of Kenosis. This is what we must firmly lodge in our mind, for we have the tendency to reinvent the wheel and end up in false doctrines. Secondly, The distinction of His two natures means, and has always meant to the church, that Jesus is just as truly God as the Father and the Spirit are God, and at the same time without confusion or contradiction, He is just as truly man as we are men. His humanity as the “last Adam” is perfectly sinless, yet genuinely human as was Adam before the fall. In this second matter we must remember that a “nature” in the Biblical usage, is not a substantive entity. It does not necessarily have substance like a body has. A nature is not a personality in the sense in which we are speaking. A nature is a complex of attributes. Since man is made in the image of God, it follows that for God the Son, without reduction of His Divine attributes, to assume a genuine human set of attributes, including a normal human body, except for sin, involves no contradiction.

The Belgic Confession declares in Articles 18 and 19, “We believe that by this conception the Person of the Son is inseparably united and connected with the human nature, so that there are not two sons of God, nor two persons, but two natures united in one single Person; yet each nature retains its own distinct properties. As then the Divine nature hath always remained uncreated, without beginning of days nor end of life, filling heaven and earth, so also hath the human nature not lost its properties, but remained a creature. But these two natures are so closely united in one Person that they were not separated even by His death. Therefore that which He, when dying, commended into the hands of His Father, was a real human spirit, departing from His body. But in the meantime the Divine nature always remained united with the human, even when He lay in the grave; and the Godhead did not cease to be in Him any more than it did when He was an infant, although it did not so clearly manifest itself for a while.

#3.       He Became One of Us (1Tim 2:5-6, 1Cor 15:21, 1Pet 2:24, Matt 7:13-14)

That Jesus is truly man is not so much in question in modern times. People like to diminish His deity so that they do not have to fear the judgment on the last day. The Scriptures call Him man in 1Tim 2:5-6. There we read, 1Tim 2:5-6, “5  For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus; 6  Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time.” God declares that there is only one Mediator, the man Christ Jesus. Are there intelligent beings on other planets in outer space? Are there aliens on other planets, waiting to invade the earth? God says: Absolutely not! There is only one Mediator, the man Christ Jesus. God did not create two different kinds of people who need two different kinds of salvation plans. There is only one Mediator. And likewise there is not one salvation plan for the Jews and another plan for the Gentiles. There is only one salvation plan and there is only one Mediator, the man Christ Jesus. Since He is our Mediator, which means our Redeemer, which means our next of kin, He must be fully man. And then we read in 1Tim 2:6, “Who gave himself a ransom for all.” This word “all” cannot refer to all mankind, for not all of mankind is being saved. In fact, in Matt 7:13-14 the Lord Jesus  said that only a remnant of mankind will be saved, for these are the people on the narrow way; but the great majority of mankind desires to go on the broad way that leads to hell. And thus, to harmonize the Bible we have to say that the word “all” in 1Tim 2:6 must refer to all the elect, and no one else. This is how we must read the Bible, for God is not a liar. All liars have their part in the lake of fire, which is the second death.

God says in 1Cor 15:21, “For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead.” And likewise we read in 1Pet 2:24, “Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.” Both verses emphasize the human nature of Christ. They tell us that Christ has a true human body. He was able to die. A spirit cannot die. His Divine nature cannot die; neither can His Divine nature suffer the wrath of God and die (Hoeksema.) The relation between the real manhood and the true Godhead of this Mediator, therefore, must be such that in the human nature the Divine nature sustains the infinite wrath of God, so that God bears the punishment for sin in the human nature. Therefore this Mediator must be God, because His work must have infinite value. His suffering and death must be imputed to all the elect. This is possible only when it is the Person of the Son of God who suffers in the human nature. It is true that the Divine nature in the Mediator does not suffer, but it is nevertheless always the Person of the Son, the Divine Person, who suffers and dies in the human nature. Therefore the Mediator must be God. For the same reason the two natures must be united in the one Person of the Son of God. He must be one Person, and not two, as was the heresy of Nestorius. If He were two persons we would have had two mediators, the one of whom would have no significance for the work of the other. That one Person of the Mediator must be the Divine Person of the Son of God, because only in this way could He stand outside of the imputation of the original guilt of sin. Had He been a human person that original guilt would also have been imputed to Him. What we have seen so far is that the two natures of Christ must be kept united in Him, inconfusedly, unchangeably, indivisibly, inseparably, the property of each nature being preserved, and concurring in one Person. Since this is too much material for one sermon we will pick this up again later.

AMEN.                  Let us turn to the Lord in prayer.